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#1
staff
Posted on Aug 01, 2012

Welcome! The HearingLikeMe forums are built to provide inspiration, connection and information to anyone touched by hearing loss. We believe that respect and kindness are key elements of this goal, and so we ask all visitors to let those qualities guide their forum behavior.

Here, people share their stories, and sometimes even bare their souls. Our rules for comments and discussions honor this sharing:

1. Be respectful – even if you disagree with someone else’s point of view.
2. No personal attacks.
3. Stay on topic.
4. Add value; don’t take it away.

These rules are designed to be simple and easily understood. They will help insure that we -- HearingLikeMe editors, readers and commenters -- create the most productive community possible.

Comments and commenters that do not follow these rules will be deleted and/or blocked from the site. You will know if you’ve stepped out-of-line when other members call you out for something you’ve said. We will know, too, and take appropriate action.

If you’re wondering whether or not you should post something borderline ask yourself: “What would my mother (or grandmother) think of me if I did this?” Then make the right choice.

One more thing. HearingLikeMe forums exist to facilitate conversations and understanding. To that end, comments should reflect the topic being discussed. Do not use the comment threads purely to promote your own site, product or business.

HearingLikeMe is about helping people, and we work hard every day to carry out this mission. Please join us.

member
Posted on Sep 14, 2012

Hello:
Thanks for this forum...it helps us all.
In 1980 i went through a very heavy cancer chemo that saved my life but took much of my high frequency hearing. In the subsequent years, my life as a metal sculptor, with it's frequent hammering and loud noises haven't helped a bit. We joke about it at the blacksmith conferences and try to push the younger members into wearing hearing protection.
I tried a number of different HAs( hearing Aids) and found that the Phonak Audeo Smart model had the best feedback suppression tech ( a critical factor for my type of hearing loss.
The sound fidelity wasn't the best but i could understand my dear wife better.
Women's sibilants ( consonant sounds) are the thing most of us boomers loose first, i, um, hear.
So i bought them.
I have a set of Phoak "Audeo Smart V" HAs that have been terrible! The quality control is inexcusable! Poorly designed and made!
The first set had the RH instrument producing horrible surging static right out of the cheesy paper bag they came in. They have had to be replaced several times since for assorted reasons.
In the couple of years i've had them, they have been partially or completely dysfunctional over 1/2 the time.
The ear speakers loose high frequency response quality beginning in just a few weeks and deteriorate from there.
I'm constantly bothering my sweet Audi to change the settings or replace the ear speakers every month or so.
I've wasted cumulative weeks, and hundreds of miles trying to get them to work as advertised.
My poor audi gal has long since lost any profit she may have made on these poorly made HAs.
The company response has been slightly more than token.
I won't make the Phonak mistake again!

  • sayWhat invited Phonak to participate in this conversation.
phonak
Posted on Sep 21, 2012

Quote:Originally posted by sayWhat:
Hello:Thanks for this forum...it helps us all.In 1980 i went through a very heavy cancer chemo that saved my life but took much of my high frequency hearing. In the subsequent years, my life as a metal sculptor, with it's frequent hammering and loud noises haven't helped a bit. We joke about it at the blacksmith conferences and try to push the younger members into wearing hearing protection.I tried a number of different HAs( hearing Aids) and found that the Phonak Audeo Smart model had the best feedback suppression tech ( a critical factor for my type of hearing loss.The sound fidelity wasn't the best but i could understand my dear wife better.....

Dear sayWhat
Thank you for your post and inviting us to comment. We regret that our product was not able to fulfill all your hearing needs. We have a broad portfolio of new solutions to suit a wide range of individual hearing needs. We would be interested to follow up with you to understand your specific needs. If that would be an option for you please contact us on hearinglikeme@phonak.com.

member
Posted on Nov 26, 2012

Does Medicaid pay for this material; Does Medicare pay?

  • Shewolf invited Phonak to participate in this conversation.
member
Posted on Jan 03, 2013

Dear Shewolf
Can you please clarify what you are making reference to in terms of medicaid or medicare coverage? Are you referring to hearing instruments? If so, there are stipulations about what is and is not covered as Medicaid and Medicare are two entirely different third party insurances. For those that have both, there is a process as well that determines the level and type of coverage.

Thanks

member
Posted on Jan 10, 2013

hi , my name is hope as i see some people share there storys but im only 13 and im getting hearing aid in about a week im very scared and i have many questions and nobody to ask , help ?

contributor
Posted on Jan 11, 2013

Hope, you are NOT alone!!! I'm glad you reached out. I'm sure it's very overwhelming. You should be excited about getting your hearing aid, as it will help you hear better. What questions do you have? Ask away!

Additionally, you might want to check out the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. It's a great support network and they have wonderful programs for teens, too. If you're on Facebook, you can look for AG Bell there.

Where in Ohio do you live? I may also be able to put you in touch with someone...

Hang in there!!

Lisa

member
Posted on Jan 11, 2013

Hi Hope,

I'm glad I saw your post, see, I'm a senior in college who like yourself has a hearing loss and I got hearing aids at 13 as well! I know how scary it can seem when you're the only one with hearing aids and not many other teens have them. I remember in middle school when I came to school the first day with them and although I could hear things I never thought I missed, I felt very secluded, but not for long. I soon met friends who like me, had hearing aids, (and I know you will too). I learned that having hearing aids made my life so much better and being scared or nervous was just a slight bump in the road. Being hard of hearing has taught me so much about not just me but other people who go through the same struggles. If you have any questions or you need someone to talk to please don't hesitate at all to contact me. I'd love to help you through this. :)

D.Jones

contributor
Posted on Jan 12, 2013

Quote:Originally posted by hopeeann:
hi , my name is hope as i see some people share there storys but im only 13 and im getting hearing aid in about a week im very scared and i have many questions and nobody to ask , help ?

Hi Hope!

Glad you're reaching out-- that's the first step in getting comfortable with this new change in your life. Back when I was a teen, I wasn't comfortable with my hearing aid (only had one back then.) When I was 19, I experienced a big change in my life and part of that was learning to EMBRACE my hearing aids. Yup, I said "embrace!" It was a process learning to do that and what helped was finding other deaf and hard of hearing folks who were doing just that-- loving every part of their life.

I hope you connect with Lisa above and get involved in the programs for teens. If there are more questions, ask away!

Karen Putz www.karenputz.com "Life is too short to sit on the sidelines. Jump in!"
member
Posted on Jan 12, 2013

i have the biggest smle on my face right now didnt think anyone would say anything , and my question is when your getting used to your hearing aids when your in a loud lunch room or an extremly loud classroom , what do you do ? whats something smart to say when someone makes fun of you ? iv been builled all my life because my weight i suffer from anorexia and im still under weight . iv been builled about my speech , my stutter , my hearing , my back round where i come from , my glasses , and now im getting hearing aids and braces. so im really scared ! iv been in depression since i was 8 and cut my self since i was 9 i just want evrything to be okay ..

member
Posted on Jan 12, 2013

and i live in lima lisa ..

member
Posted on Jan 12, 2013

and i live in lima lisa ..

contributor
Posted on Jan 14, 2013

Hope, so glad you saw our posts!!

Are you getting digital aids? If so, they'll be able to program them to best help you, and depending on the aid, you may have some control over it. You should be able to control the volume. If you're in a loud environment, you can lower the volume until you're more comfortable, and then increase it in other situations.

Some devices have the capability to increase the volume of speech in noisy environments.

Most people have had braces - I did. I'm sure many of your classmates have or will! My 11-year-old daughter just got them a couple of weeks ago, and her friends are jealous that she got them before they did!! There are even colors now, apparently, which girls can use to "accessorize." Crazy!

It sounds like you've had a rough time of it. Asking questions and for support is a great step! I've emailed a friend of mine who lives in Cleveland and is active in the speaking deaf community to ask if she knows any deaf people near Lima...

Have people made fun of you because of your hearing? What do they say? When you get your aids, you can say things like, "Now I can hear your insults..." or "Now I can hear your insults better, and I wasn't missing anything..." You can emphasize how much the aids help you...

Lisa

member
Posted on Jan 15, 2013

Hello All,
I have always had bad hearing. I can hear higher pitched sounds great but low sounds not so well. Spent alot of time reading lips and looking at body language to see what people were saying. A new problem has popped up. I am using the wrong tones to speak with. I hear the right tone and the person I am speaking to says I said it was wrong. The words are right but my tones were wrong. Possible?

member
Posted on Jan 27, 2013

Quote:Originally posted by BonnieS:
Welcome! The HearingLikeMe forums are built to provide inspiration, connection and information to anyone touched by hearing loss. We believe that respect and kindness are key elements of this goal, and so we ask all visitors to let those qualities guide their forum behavior.

Here, people share their stories, and sometimes even bare their souls. Our rules for comments and discussions honor this sharing:

1. Be respectful – even if you disagree with someone else’s point of view.
2. No personal attacks.
3. Stay on topic.
4. Add value; don’t take it away.

These rules are designed to be simple and easily understood. They will help insure that we -- HearingLikeMe editors, readers and commenters -- create the most productive community possible.

Comments and commenters that do not follow these rules will be deleted and/or blocked from the site. You will know if you’ve stepped out-of-line when other members call you out for something you’ve said. We will know, too, and take appropriate action.

If you’re wondering whether or not you should post something borderline ask yourself: “What would my mother (or grandmother) think of me if I did this?” Then make the right choice.

One more thing. HearingLikeMe forums exist to facilitate conversations and understanding. To that end, comments should reflect the topic being discussed. Do not use the comment threads purely to promote your own site, product or business.

HearingLikeMe is about helping people, and we work hard every day to carry out this mission. Please join us.

Am I inputting at the right place?

There are characteristics of hearing loss in our interactions that span the continuum of hearing loss. One, I would really love to discuss.

I find that many, but not all, hearing challenged individuals have a unique openness and trust about them, if they cope with their challenges. Many of us know those that fit the biblical adage - "without guile." Some may seem loony aloof with their mannerism. Then their are those who often can be very direct and neither discrete nor reticent. I would say they have an acceptance about their challenge that does not intimidate them. At times it seems like an incorrigibility as well.

But, secondly their is also lurking in the shadows an anger and bitterness that permeates the fabric between the HoH and of those whose hearing we consider statistically normal, The fear that leads to non-disclose of hearing issue. The bitterness of either impoverished qualitative and or quantitative social connections.

Unless their are other mitigating disabilities, if you are challenged with a hearing loss, it does not cause you brain to shrivel up and disappear.

So what understanding can we share about what is a unique attribute of many who have long term hearing challenges? Audiologists are almost all hands on experience in this realm. Medical Insurance covers little or none of these issues. Yet, it is the elephant in the room!

Correlation is the greatest skill of intelligence. And Intelligence must be book ended by humility and gratitude.
  • The Man From Bear River invited Phonak to participate in this conversation.
member
Posted on Jan 27, 2013

Quote:Originally posted by damwoman2000:
Hello All,
I have always had bad hearing. I can hear higher pitched sounds great but low sounds not so well. Spent alot of time reading lips and looking at body language to see what people were saying. A new problem has popped up. I am using the wrong tones to speak with. I hear the right tone and the person I am speaking to says I said it was wrong. The words are right but my tones were wrong. Possible?

Rote recitation of sound is only part of the challenge of acquiring language and the totality of communication skills. Tone is important. Tone connotes a lot socially and the social is our dominate environment. You can have an IQ of 200, but without good social skills (including tone) in the eyes iof the beholder you have a challenge. This is the realm of speech therapists, and those that work the hard of hearing loss issues, generally in government. There are equipments that you can listen to, so that you can better comprehend AND feel in your soul what it you are saying and work on that presentation and articulation.

Now know this. This challenge does not mean you are any less of a person. Remember, "if it is to be, it is up to me." You have to seek out the services and the information on line and on foot. If you have the issues you suggest, there is no where in the Western Civilization that you cannot get services, and likely at no or minimal cost. You have to be the informed consumer, the informed client.

You may be horrified that your friend said that the tone came out wrong. That is the best kind of friend anyone could ever hope for - they gave you feedback, and you did not ask for it to begin with. WOW! Those are the friends to keep in your arsenal of relationships if I sense anything right. Take intiative, be proactive, do not dwell on what is wrong. Express it as a challenge and work the plan to deal with those or that challenge(s).

In my mortal sojourn I have found my deafness to be a great blessing. It challenged my brain to understand my world in a way no instructor could. I came from a mentor who was all about taking whatever life gives you and make the most of it. And she was right. The failures she encountered along the way with clients, were mostly self inflicted or had terrible family dynamics.

I have found in 6 decades that the hard of hearing and deaf are the ones who sell ourselves the shortest. I would say that the statistically average audiologist probably sees more expectation in 7 out 10 clients than they see in themselves. Get an audiologist who is really up on the technological developments and the recent ones are enormous. Never go to an audiologist who is nothing more than a product salesman. Find those that are systemic consultants who look at all the nuances!

Hope that helps. Yeah, I am tonally geeky and communicate like some nerdy researcher.

Correlation is the greatest skill of intelligence. And Intelligence must be book ended by humility and gratitude.
  • The Man From Bear River invited Phonak to participate in this conversation.
member
Posted on Feb 08, 2013

Quote:Originally posted by hopeeann:
hi , my name is hope as i see some people share there storys but im only 13 and im getting hearing aid in about a week im very scared and i have many questions and nobody to ask , help ?

Hi Hope.....my name is Caryl and I'm 44 yrs old....I wear 2 hearing aids and I have wore them all my life.......I know how u feel by being scared.....please feel free to ask me questions and I would love to help you as much as I can through this.

professional
Posted on May 02, 2013

Quote:Originally posted by hopeeann:
hi , my name is hope as i see some people share there storys but im only 13 and im getting hearing aid in about a week im very scared and i have many questions and nobody to ask , help ?

You may ask me any question you would like. I am a licensed Audiologists and am on the Board of Trustees for the New Jersey Hearing Loss Association, if I can not answer your question, I can help find the right person who can....And that's a promise.

Dr. David Cooper, Sc.D., CCC-A, FAAA HEAR-4-U.com 732-922-HEAR (4327) 732-817-1834 (Fax)
  • Dr. Cooper invited Phonak to participate in this conversation.
member
Posted on May 02, 2013

I am a 53 yo woman who has been HOH since babyhood due to a non diagnosed ear infection. I grew up thinking my right ear was merely a way to balance out my face. My parents were pretty much in denial of my hearing loss for several years until I was twelve. For a long time my parents thought I was somewhere out in left field. So there was really no support for me whatsoever. I had to learn on my own..meaning lipreading and body language. I thank God for being taught phonics in elementary school, so I am very well read and very intelligent. My left ear at the time was only at fifty percent and as I have aged I am losing more of my hearing. I also have tinnitinitus which is a very persistent ringing. Imagine an organ key being pressed constantly emitting that one note twenty-four/seven!! That started at age seventeen. I did not receive my first hearing aid until I was twenty-four. I did not learn about "deaf" behavior until my mid forties. I use sign as a second language after spending three years in a deaf community in Florida. I consider myself to be a sort of hybrid because for so many years I've managed to hide my deafness since I learned to speak so well. I can no longer do that. Lately,I have faced a lot of discrimination in the workplace and in getting a job. (Does anyone know of a job that does not use phones???) My marriage to a hearing man is stressed due to his impatience with my hearing loss and what friends I currently have, no matter how many times I beg, do not use text when calling me. For many years I have dealt with anger, self-esteem issues, and depression with little or no help available to me. My husband had to pay out of pocket for a hearing aid that we had to wait for a year! Florida is not known for just handing out Medicaid....so currently I am trying to find some kind of work that would help me pay for my student loans and medical bills because my husband refuses to help me thinking that I have become "lazy". Any ideas???

Aislinn1
member
Posted on May 19, 2013

Dear Aislinn1
Healthcare/ CNA work is a very promissing and rewarding field to be in (or it has been for me). You work directly with older or middle aged people and you don't have to answer any phones. There are many nursing homes that will pay for your CNA class if you will work at their nursing home after you become a CNA. State Vocational Rehab has accomidated my hearing impairment on the job by helping me get hearing aids and an amplified stethoscope as well. The only problem I have is hearing which direction sounds (bed alarms) are coming from because of my hearing loss.
I think you are amazing being profoundly deaf for so long and not getting hearing aids until you were 24. I understand completely about the anger, depression, and self-esteem issues; that was me for the longest. Good luck in finding a healthcare job. I'm sure you'll do just fine.

member
Posted on May 21, 2013

Hi have Idiopathic Sudden Sensory-Neural Hearing Loss (ISSNHL.)

My left ear is considered profoundly deaf and my right ear has several frequencies that are simply non-functional.

That leaves a few frequencies in my right ear that are functional but have declined due to typical age related conditions but, more significantly, have suffered a lot of damage from being a drummer in a rock band in my youth.

State of the art hearing aids do not compensate for the above condition very well at all. And, I do not qualify, yet, for a cochlear implant.

The ISSNHL part of the conditions above emerged over the past five years but has accelerated over the past two years. And, frequencies vanish within a 72 hour period or less (hence, ‘Sudden’ in ISSHNL.) There is no telling how much more or when more frequencies will become non-functional.

I am 69, very healthy, otherwise, and have been very social, with a healthy sense of humor, in the past.

I am now frustrated, isolated, depressed without a clue what to do with my retirement. (Please, only thoughtful suggestions … I have heard all the rest.) I can hear slightly and that is, ironically, the bad part because, if I hear anything, people assume I can hear everything. Besides, people cannot ‘see’ my hearing loss. I look normal.

I am looking for emotional support more than ‘guidance’. I have done a lot of Web searching and have found very few decent forums that focus on the emotional experience of going deaf. And, having been in the software development business for 40+ years, I know my way around the Internet. I believe that, if I were more positive through support and communication with those of similar experiences, etc., I could probably figure out what to do. Right now my drug of choice is sleep.

So, I am looking for people who have had or are having a similar experience as mine.

member
Posted on Feb 01, 2014

Quote:Originally posted by hopeeann:
i have the biggest smle on my face right now didnt think anyone would say anything , and my question is when your getting used to your hearing aids when your in a loud lunch room or an extremly loud classroom , what do you do ? whats something smart to say when someone makes fun of you ? iv been builled all my life because my weight i suffer from anorexia and im still under weight . iv been builled about my speech , my stutter , my hearing , my back round where i come from , my glasses , and now im getting hearing aids and braces. so im really scared ! iv been in depression since i was 8 and cut my self since i was 9 i just want evrything to be okay ..

When I am in a loud lunch room I try to sit so that my good ear is toward the speaker. I also do a little bit of lip reading and ask questions for the things I did not hear.

member
Posted on Feb 09, 2014

Quote:Originally posted by BillOfCV:
Hi have Idiopathic Sudden Sensory-Neural Hearing Loss (ISSNHL.)

My left ear is considered profoundly deaf and my right ear has several frequencies that are simply non-functional.

That leaves a few frequencies in my right ear that are functional but have declined due to typical age related conditions but, more significantly, have suffered a lot of damage from being a drummer in a rock band in my youth.

State of the art hearing aids do not compensate for the above condition very well at all. And, I do not qualify, yet, for a cochlear implant.

The ISSNHL part of the conditions above emerged over the past five years but has accelerated over the past two years. And, frequencies vanish within a 72 hour period or less (hence, ‘Sudden’ in ISSHNL.) There is no telling how much more or when more frequencies will become non-functional.

I am 69, very healthy, otherwise, and have been very social, with a healthy sense of humor, in the past.

I am now frustrated, isolated, depressed without a clue what to do with my retirement. (Please, only thoughtful suggestions … I have heard all the rest.) I can hear slightly and that is, ironically, the bad part because, if I hear anything, people assume I can hear everything. Besides, people cannot ‘see’ my hearing loss. I look normal.

I am looking for emotional support more than ‘guidance’. I have done a lot of Web searching and have found very few decent forums that focus on the emotional experience of going deaf. And, having been in the software development business for 40+ years, I know my way around the Internet. I believe that, if I were more positive through support and communication with those of similar experiences, etc., I could probably figure out what to do. Right now my drug of choice is sleep.

So, I am looking for people who have had or are having a similar experience as mine.

Hello Bill, your story so similar to mine as are your observations in this whole hearing loss thing. Deaf in one ear, cannot hear out of the other is not fun when it is true. I have profound hearing loss in one ear, moderate to profound loss in other ear last time I was tested, but it sure is not getting better! Grin
I also became depressed about my hearing loss, sat at home avoiding contact in noisy rooms. Blah blah blah, you obviously know the rest.
Here's my story of solution.
In 2007 I joined an online group, much like this one. The first thing I realized is that suddenly I COULD HEAR! No longer was I considered unfriendly because I did not answer to a "hello" or join into a conversation because I had no idea what the topic was about. And it was never good to be smiling when someone said their dog died. Ugh. Being enjoyed for my sense of humour, my observations, my friendliness was something I had never experienced. I am still active on that site. Two years ago, I took that confidence into the real world and joined a walking group. Sounds easy enough, but I was so nervous I would not hear enough to even know where I was walking to and Heaven knows where I could end up! But, here's the thing. You are right, our hearing disability is not visible so I told them I had a problem. For me, that's the best but hardest thing to admit to people. I have a friend in the walking club who always introduces me to people in the same way. "This is Sherry, she is hard of hearing".
So that's my first solution, at least the one that has done the most for me. Accept my problem, but don't dwell on it. Tell others! 99% will understand and be caring.
Bill, you awake? :-)

This is my first post, looking forward to sharing and "listening" to everyone.

  • Gsherry invited Phonak to participate in this conversation.
member
Posted on Oct 04, 2014

Quote:Originally posted by BillOfCV:
Hi have Idiopathic Sudden Sensory-Neural Hearing Loss (ISSNHL.)

My left ear is considered profoundly deaf and my right ear has several frequencies that are simply non-functional.

That leaves a few frequencies in my right ear that are functional but have declined due to typical age related conditions but, more significantly, have suffered a lot of damage from being a drummer in a rock band in my youth.

State of the art hearing aids do not compensate for the above condition very well at all. And, I do not qualify, yet, for a cochlear implant.

The ISSNHL part of the conditions above emerged over the past five years but has accelerated over the past two years. And, frequencies vanish within a 72 hour period or less (hence, ‘Sudden’ in ISSHNL.) There is no telling how much more or when more frequencies will become non-functional.

I am 69, very healthy, otherwise, and have been very social, with a healthy sense of humor, in the past.

I am now frustrated, isolated, depressed without a clue what to do with my retirement. (Please, only thoughtful suggestions … I have heard all the rest.) I can hear slightly and that is, ironically, the bad part because, if I hear anything, people assume I can hear everything. Besides, people cannot ‘see’ my hearing loss. I look normal.

I am looking for emotional support more than ‘guidance’. I have done a lot of Web searching and have found very few decent forums that focus on the emotional experience of going deaf. And, having been in the software development business for 40+ years, I know my way around the Internet. I believe that, if I were more positive through support and communication with those of similar experiences, etc., I could probably figure out what to do. Right now my drug of choice is sleep.

So, I am looking for people who have had or are having a similar experience as mine.

Hi, I can relate with no hearing in my left ear and intermittent hearing loss that is getting worse in my right ear. My rheumatologist calls it "autoimmune hearing loss" and my ENT doctor calls it "Meniere's Disease with an autoimmune component." It may be a genetic as my mother started losing her hearing in her 30's.

I am also very into music and released three albums as a singer/songwriter. Though I am currently working on my 4th, I don't know if I will finish it because my hearing has become so bad. I won't do a show without a good sound guy.

I work as a social worker in a noisy place and may have to retire before I even turn 40 because I'm realizing that my hearing loss interferes with my ability to do my job effectively. But I can't afford to just quit without figuring something out and you can't apply for disability until you've stopped working for a year. Not sure what to do about that.

The whole thing has been very depressing for me and no one really understands. It has created a spiritual crisis of sorts for me as I don't know what to do with my late. Both my vocation and my passion (music) rely on hearing which I have less and less of. I'm looking into getting back into a counseling through my employer's free EAP program to deal with latest bout of hearing loss and how it has affected my ability to work and my life in general.

I try to NOT go to social events and when I do go, I hope no one talks to me because it's too hard to try to hear or read lips and most people don't want to take the time to repeat themselves or talk louder. Even my husband gives up and says, "never mind" when I don't hear what he's saying.

The important thing is to focus on gratitude. I am a cancer survivor also and nothing makes you learn the lesson of gratitude like cancer. Believe it or not, there are worse things that could be happening to me and worse things going on in the world. What also helps is my believe in life after death and reincarnation and karma. I feel that illnesses can be karmic in nature and this helps me accept my hearing loss better. I believe that I won't be deaf when I cross over and that I won't be deaf in other lifetimes. In this lifetime, I believe my spiritual purpose is to pay off karmic debts so if my illness is karmic, then I can accept it. I can read and write and I can connect with people online. This is a blessing. I can also connect with people through pictures because I still have my vision and a picture is worth 1000 words.

Currently, I am just trying to find a way to survive and figure out my next move with regards to finances. I've always been a social worker and you need your hearing big time when you are a social worker. People have suggested that I work with deaf people but I don't know sign language yet and don't know how to read lips. Perhaps these are things I need to learn how to do but these classes probably require money and time - things I am short of. Anyway, just wanted to let you know that I can relate to how your feeling, at least a little.

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