X

The Forums

To join a discussion or start a new topic, select a forum from the list below. Remember to keep your profile up-to-date and follow forum guidelines.

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features.

Members can post topics, respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features of the HearingLikeMe community. More reasons to join >

Not a member? Join Now.

New here, maybe I wont feel so alone now

Pages

#1
member
Posted on Jan 29, 2013

Hi Everyone! I hope this site helps me. I am a 44 y.o. lady who got my first pair of aids 5 years ago. I am married, 4 kids, 1 grandson, another grandchild on the way in the summer, I also am in college, the only person in the school with hearing aids. You would think with so many people I deal with on a daily basis, I wouldnt feel alone, yet I do. No one knows the embarrassment of wearing hearing aids, the shame I feel at times when someone finds out. I am glad I can hear my grandson laugh, best sound in the world but honestly, it stinks having hearing loss. My latest hearing test was 65 to 70% hearing loss, 5 yrs ago when I went for my first hearing test since I was a kid it was only 50%. I am getting into the business world soon and I am scared to be turned down due to my hearing aids, since its a "disability". Sorry to go on and on but I just needed to vent.

member
Posted on Feb 22, 2013

Hi. I'm so sorry that you feel that having a hearing loss is something to be ashamed of. That's part of the cultural norm that needs to be changed! For me it's not that I'm ashamed, it's that it's such a pain having to constantly remind the people around you that you CAN'T hear! Even my husband of 17 years still talks to me from several rooms away and it's always me that has to walk to him so that I can hear him. People with glasses have an obvious clue, but you and I fit in as "normal" when most of the time I'm just faking my way through a conversation. You rock just the way you are and I hope that you know just how wonderful you are!

  • dtmiot invited Phonak to participate in this conversation.
member
Posted on Feb 23, 2013

Hi, so sorry you feel this way. 22 and I've been deaf all my life so I know the initial feelings of being alone and feeling ashamed. It took a while for me to stop being so ashamed of it and preoccupied with trying to fit in and just accept who I am. I know exactly how it feels to be embarrassed by hearing aides... I didn't get my first one till I was in middle school and I hated the fact that I was different because of it. i wore my hair down all the time in an attempt to hide it so it was a very difficult time for me to re-adjust and constantly fearing rejection from fellow classmates as they eventually found that I was hearing impaired. It turned out later on that I had nothing to worry about because many of my classmates were very sweet and understanding. They always made sure new teachers and substitutes knew of my disability and helped me with note taking and other various class activities and it stayed like that all the way up till our graduation. My point is, you are very likely to find people that are accepting of your hearing loss and it sounds like your family is very supportive, and you have us so you aren't alone :)

as for the business world, technically they can't turn you down because of your hearing aides. That's discriminating against a legally defined disability and they can get into trouble for it. The Americans with Disabilities Act was very clear about that :) there's tons of assistive listening devices out there for us to use in the workplace.

"God grant me the SERENITY to accept the things I cannot change, the COURAGE to change the things I can, and the WISDOM to know the difference"
phonak
Posted on Feb 25, 2013

Quote:Originally posted by dtmiot:
Hi. I'm so sorry that you feel that having a hearing loss is something to be ashamed of. That's part of the cultural norm that needs to be changed! For me it's not that I'm ashamed, it's that it's such a pain having to constantly remind the people around you that you CAN'T hear! Even my husband of 17 years still talks to me from several rooms away and it's always me that has to walk to him so that I can hear him. People with glasses have an obvious clue, but you and I fit in as "normal" when most of the time I'm just faking my way through a conversation. You rock just the way you are and I hope that you know just how wonderful you are!

Dear Dtmiot

Thanks for inviting us to this. We'd like to thank you and beautifultragedy for your contributions. Many people here face the same challenges and everyone deals with it in their own way. We find you words of encouragement and insights in your own way of handling your hearing/loss to be exactely what this site was made for.

Dear MSmith43616

We thank you for your contribution and opening this thread. It takes courage to admit that not everythings is perfect all the time in today's world and it is fantastic that you share it here. We'd like to reinforce beautifultragedy's comment on assistive listening devices. Today's hearing technology offers many, many solutions that can help you greatly in basically any environment. May we suggest that you talk to your audiologist to make sure you have or find a solution that will take your very personal everyday needs into account. We wish you all the best for you, your family and your future professional endeavours.

member
Posted on Feb 26, 2013

Glad you posted your comments. Many people with hearing loss feel the same way about wearing hearing aids. Unfortunately not wearing them cuts one off from lots of communication. Best to accept wearing whatever system gives you the best results, no matter whether they're obvious or not. Once you do that your feelings about everything will improve dramatically.

BillAg

member
Posted on Feb 26, 2013

I am 29 and have had hearing aids since I was 18 months old, even though I have had them my whole life I still always felt ashamed about them when I was in school , I had to wear an amplifier during classes so I could hear the teachers. I always wore my hair down and didn't really want people to know about my hearing aids. Now just recently I have no problems at all wearing my hair up! I WANT people to know about us! I know that we are beautiful, inside and out, God will not give us more then we can handle! Have u ever seen the show "Switched at Birth" on ABC, Monday nights 7 pm , that show has really made me feel so much better! I think u should watch it ;-)

  • Candace invited Phonak to participate in this conversation.
phonak
Posted on Feb 26, 2013

Dear Candace

Thank you for inviting us to this. Just as many of our contributors on this website state, this thread reflects everyday life and the ups and downs when being deaf or hard of hearing. We love the positivity that you and the others bring here and are convinced that every comment will help many others right now and over time. Thanks!

member
Posted on Mar 23, 2013

I think the stigma of hearing aids is something you have to change in yourself. I specifically pull my hair back and wear fancy earrings to draw attention to my ears, and I like being able to show people my hearing aids so they know I can't hear them very well. It makes it easier and I don't have to say "What" so much. It's funny though, when I tell people I have hearing aids in and I need them to speak more clearly, or directly at me, or whatever and I show them my ears their response is always, "OMG I didn't even notice!"
I don't think people see hearing aids as gross, or stupid, or ugly as much as those of us who wear them think it. I hope you realize that just because you have hearing aids doesn't mean you are less of a person. Just think about how much more amazing of a grandma you are because you can hear your grandson. Hearing aids are not the devil, they are amazing tools some of us use to be even better than we were before ;)

member
Posted on May 16, 2013

Dear MSmith,
Did you know there are nearly 50 million people in the US with some form of hearing loss yet the average person waits 7 to 10 years to get tested? These numbers stund me, and I hate the fact that hearing impairment has become the accepted disability in the US. I think you are not the only one in the college in Ohio with hearing aids, or with hearing loss for that matter. Now imagine all the people with a hearing loss who go unaided. I was one of those people for 21 years! I am now nearly deaf in the ear that was aided all through high school and 4 years of college. The main reason I went in for testing was not being able to hear on the job. Well, guess what? I just got 2 brand new CIC hearing aids 7 months ago paid for by State Vocational Rehab, and I am still going unaided. They are the wrong HA's for my hearing impairment, and since it's been so long since I heard anything, I didn't realize it until it was too late :o(
I am so very glad we found this site and so glad there is technology out there to help us today. One day I hope to have one of those Phonak CROS hearing aids I learned about last week for single-sided deafness. Thank you Phonak for having me.

  • CindyLou invited Phonak to participate in this conversation.
phonak
Posted on May 17, 2013

Dear CindyLou

Yes, that is true that a lot of people wait a long time before they get their hearing tested. It is a shame as they probably struggle with their hearing for quite a while whereas they could actually be benefiting a lot from hearing aids. One reason may be that some people still imagine hearing aids to look like how they did look like 20 years ago whereas technology has moved on a lot since then. It is great that you tried out some hearing aids and it is unfortunate that they were not the right ones for your hearing loss.

If you try out the Phonak CROS aids please share your experience on the site so we know how you are getting on with them.

member
Posted on May 18, 2013

My own tactic with hearing aids is to flaunt them. I get the brightest color I can find and I also often wedar a badge which says,
I am hard of hearing. Please face me when speaking.

Further, it is now illegal for an employer to discriminate against you because you have a hearing problem. Especially when you are seeking to correct the problem by wearing hearing aids.

I've heard your lament from dozens of people I've been counseling on hearing issues over the past twenty years. Don't' let them get you down. You are right and they are wrong as well as narrow minded.

I'm reminded of a student I once had who was quite crippled from childhood polio. She told me, if I'm a gimp, you're a TAB. That stands for Temporarily Able Bodied.

Allan Gunnar Feldt, author of "Adapting to Hearing Loss: What I learned during 30 years of hearing loss." ebook and text editions at Amazon.com
member
Posted on May 21, 2013

I'm sure you aren't the only one at the college with hearing aids or hearing loss. Look around you and statistically one in four have a diagnosed or undiagnosed hearing loss. The one thing I have noticed about wearing hearing aids is first, very few people notice them and second, no one cares if you wear hearing aids, they are to busy living their life to care about yours. I have also found the best approach regarding my hearing loss is tell someone up front about it and don't try and hide my hearing aids, and once you tell people and get it out in the open you find that they don't treat you any differently. I also wear a Streamer around my neck and those that ask what it's for basically want one and my answer is go get your hearing tested and maybe you can get one!
Unfortunately, very few people get a hearing test as part of a physical and go for decades between hearing tests. I was one of those who went decades and had no idea my hearing was as bad as it was but once I found out I did something about it and haven't looked back or said why me. We are all different and some go through the five stages of grieving at different speeds before we reach finally reach acceptance and some never get there.

member
Posted on May 21, 2013

Quote:Originally posted by MSmith43616:
Hi Everyone! I hope this site helps me. I am a 44 y.o. lady who got my first pair of aids 5 years ago. I am married, 4 kids, 1 grandson, another grandchild on the way in the summer, I also am in college, the only person in the school with hearing aids. You would think with so many people I deal with on a daily basis, I wouldnt feel alone, yet I do. No one knows the embarrassment of wearing hearing aids, the shame I feel at times when someone finds out. I am glad I can hear my grandson laugh, best sound in the world but honestly, it stinks having hearing loss. My latest hearing test was 65 to 70% hearing loss, 5 yrs ago when I went for my first hearing test since I was a kid it was only 50%. I am getting into the business world soon and I am scared to be turned down due to my hearing aids, since its a "disability". Sorry to go on and on but I just needed to vent.

There is nothing to be embarrassed about. Are you learning to use American Sign Language? If you would like to learn or practice what you've learned, please visit an ASL congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses. There's one near Oregon, OH in Toledo. The address is 1722 Cherry St, Toledo OH. They meet on Monday evenings at 7pm and Saturday mornings at 10am. You do not have to be one of Jehovah's Witnesses. We often have Deaf observers come check us out. The meetings are all in ASL. The attendees are hearing and Deaf and they all communicate via ASL. There is never a collection.

Hope this helps.

Lin

Lin Ebron Davis ASL Family Eastern NC
member
Posted on May 21, 2013

Hi have Idiopathic Sudden Sensory-Neural Hearing Loss (ISSNHL.)

My left ear is considered profoundly deaf and my right ear has several frequencies that are simply non-functional.

That leaves a few frequencies in my right ear that are functional but have declined due to typical age related conditions but, more significantly, have suffered a lot of damage from being a drummer in a rock band in my youth.

State of the art hearing aids do not compensate for the above condition very well at all. And, I do not qualify, yet, for a cochlear implant.

The ISSNHL part of the conditions above emerged over the past five years but has accelerated over the past two years. And, frequencies vanish within a 72 hour period or less (hence, ‘Sudden’ in ISSHNL.) There is no telling how much more or when more frequencies will become non-functional.

I am 69, very healthy, otherwise, and have been very social, with a healthy sense of humor, in the past.

I am now frustrated, isolated, depressed without a clue what to do with my retirement. (Please, only thoughtful suggestions … I have heard all the rest.) I can hear slightly and that is, ironically, the bad part because, if I hear anything, people assume I can hear everything. Besides, people cannot ‘see’ my hearing loss. I look normal.

I am looking for emotional support more than ‘guidance’. I have done a lot of Web searching and have found very few decent forums that focus on the emotional experience of going deaf. And, having been in the software development business for 40+ years, I know my way around the Internet. I believe that, if I were more positive through support and communication with those of similar experiences, etc., I could probably figure out what to do. Right now my drug of choice is sleep.

So, I am looking for people who have had or are having a similar experience as mine.

member
Posted on Jan 05, 2014

I know what you are going thru. I am 58 but have been wearing hearing aids since I was 23 (body type to behind the ear). yes it is very frustrating at times. I am deaf in my right ear and am considering CROS type aids. I get frustrated when people mumble and I ask them to speak slow and clearly but they just go on mumbling. I avoid social situations because I really can't follow a conversation very well. I concentrate on one person and when another speaks I have to adjust volume and turn towards that person already missing half of what they said.

Richard
member
Posted on Jan 05, 2014

Richard,

Are you a candidate for a cochlear implant? I know a couple of people who have them and they say it changed their life.

member
Posted on Jan 15, 2014

Quote:Originally posted by BillOfCV:
Hi have Idiopathic Sudden Sensory-Neural Hearing Loss (ISSNHL.)

My left ear is considered profoundly deaf and my right ear has several frequencies that are simply non-functional.

That leaves a few frequencies in my right ear that are functional but have declined due to typical age related conditions but, more significantly, have suffered a lot of damage from being a drummer in a rock band in my youth.

State of the art hearing aids do not compensate for the above condition very well at all. And, I do not qualify, yet, for a cochlear implant.

The ISSNHL part of the conditions above emerged over the past five years but has accelerated over the past two years. And, frequencies vanish within a 72 hour period or less (hence, ‘Sudden’ in ISSHNL.) There is no telling how much more or when more frequencies will become non-functional.

I am 69, very healthy, otherwise, and have been very social, with a healthy sense of humor, in the past.

I am now frustrated, isolated, depressed without a clue what to do with my retirement. (Please, only thoughtful suggestions … I have heard all the rest.) I can hear slightly and that is, ironically, the bad part because, if I hear anything, people assume I can hear everything. Besides, people cannot ‘see’ my hearing loss. I look normal.

I am looking for emotional support more than ‘guidance’. I have done a lot of Web searching and have found very few decent forums that focus on the emotional experience of going deaf. And, having been in the software development business for 40+ years, I know my way around the Internet. I believe that, if I were more positive through support and communication with those of similar experiences, etc., I could probably figure out what to do. Right now my drug of choice is sleep.

So, I am looking for people who have had or are having a similar experience as mine.

I am in the same boat as you are, 64, recently retired, isolated and depressed. My wife wants to drag me to social events and I just can't stand them now. I would also like to find some meaningful work. I was a high school science teacher and science/technology coordinator so I have some knowledge. Besides social gatherings I find not being able to talk on a phone to be the most frustrating. Listening to music is what I miss the most.

member
Posted on Jan 15, 2014

Quote:Originally posted by MSmith43616:
Hi Everyone! I hope this site helps me. I am a 44 y.o. lady who got my first pair of aids 5 years ago. I am married, 4 kids, 1 grandson, another grandchild on the way in the summer, I also am in college, the only person in the school with hearing aids. You would think with so many people I deal with on a daily basis, I wouldnt feel alone, yet I do. No one knows the embarrassment of wearing hearing aids, the shame I feel at times when someone finds out. I am glad I can hear my grandson laugh, best sound in the world but honestly, it stinks having hearing loss. My latest hearing test was 65 to 70% hearing loss, 5 yrs ago when I went for my first hearing test since I was a kid it was only 50%. I am getting into the business world soon and I am scared to be turned down due to my hearing aids, since its a "disability". Sorry to go on and on but I just needed to vent.

I am really surprised how many people find hearing aids embarrassing. Maybe it is because I already have to live with facial paralysis on one side but I feel my hearing loss is not something to be ashamed of.

member
member
Posted on Feb 01, 2014

I'm new on here and looking for some advice!

I lost my hearing 3 years ago, caused by constant middle ear infections through my childhood. Scared? Big time. Alone? Most definitely. Having a loss that dropped off so quickly was not the plan. I was suppose to graduate high school and go to college like any other 18 year old girl. Well I embraced my loss which went down to almost nothing, I am the proud owner of bilateral hot pink Phonak hearing aides. Never in the 3 of wearing aides have I felt "stupid" or "ashamed" for being hard of hearing until this semester of college. I wasn't understanding what the directions were so the professor had to explain them to me multiple times for the interpreter to sign. Well she got down to inches from my face and yelled the directions hoping with more volume I would catch on. No. It was humiliating in front of my group, class, and interpreters.
*I need my deaf pride back, any advice?

Keep on dreamin' even if it breaks your heart.
  • tye.holly invited Phonak to participate in this conversation.
member
Posted on Feb 02, 2014

Quote:Originally posted by tye.holly:
I'm new on here and looking for some advice!

I lost my hearing 3 years ago, caused by constant middle ear infections through my childhood. Scared? Big time. Alone? Most definitely. Having a loss that dropped off so quickly was not the plan. I was suppose to graduate high school and go to college like any other 18 year old girl. Well I embraced my loss which went down to almost nothing, I am the proud owner of bilateral hot pink Phonak hearing aides. Never in the 3 of wearing aides have I felt "stupid" or "ashamed" for being hard of hearing until this semester of college. I wasn't understanding what the directions were so the professor had to explain them to me multiple times for the interpreter to sign. Well she got down to inches from my face and yelled the directions hoping with more volume I would catch on. No. It was humiliating in front of my group, class, and interpreters.
*I need my deaf pride back, any advice?

You need to have a serious talk with the professor and explain to her that you have hearing loss, no you are not stupid and she owes you an apology in front of the class for how you were treated. If she refuses, go to her department head and file a complaint, no one deserves to be treated as you were! At the very least she owes you the apology and maybe she needs to attend some sensitivity classes.
You can also explain to her your problem isn't one of not enough volume but clarity; if she speaks clearly and enunciates what she is saying you might be able to understand most of what she says, but obviously she must have the problem since the interpreter couldn't understand either. Good luck!

member
Posted on Feb 02, 2014

Please help me and fill out this survey for hearing loss. I am doing a school project designing a product for someone with moderate hearing loss. It would really help me a lot. Thanks so much.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/HRZ3S3M

THANKS SO MUCH! :)

& MSmith you are not alone, you are a beautiful person:)

member
Posted on Feb 03, 2014

I changed my picture on this form to a picture to where my hearing aid shows. I had picked the kids up from school last week and my daughter loved the hair pin I had in my hair. She asked to take a picture and she did and when I looked at it I noticed how the hearing aid showed. She asked me to put the picture on facebook. I sat there for the longest time and didn't know if I wanted to because of that fact. This isn't something I hide but there are people that don't know if I haven't seen them in sometime. My daughter who is 10 finally said "why wouldn't you post the picture mom, Dad wears his glasses in all his pictures." You know sometimes it takes a childs wisdom. That is true it is who I am. I am a mom of two, I work at the school and I happen to be hard of hearing. I need to embrace who I am and it isn't always easy but is life easy?

mom of two with moderate-severe hearing loss
member
Posted on Feb 07, 2014

Hi Tye.holly
Thank you for asking us to join in. Streamer clearly pointed out there is definitely a need to have a discussion with your professor about your specific needs. It sounds like this person clearly does not understand that it is not a matter of volume. One suggestion would be to work with the accessibility office (sometimes called disability office) at your school. They can help bridge the gap between yourself and teachers. Depending upon what support you can get, some places will have an officer meet with your teacher prior to the start of a semester and review your individual needs. This may include also obtaining copies of all slides or lecture material, reviewing better communication practices, agreeing to have all directions, project instructions, etc in writing. Personal experience has taught me that often insensitive gestures are related to an individual's lack of knowledge.
Some simple things that can make your life much easier can be things like
1. Asking the professor (outside of classtime) to please write down any instructions on the board at the end of a lecture so it is clear
2. If something is not understood, rather than just repeating it again, re-phrasing can help with understanding.
3. Finding a common time each week to review the key concepts with the professor to confirm that you have gotten all of the important information.
4. Partner with someone in the class that can provide you with details that you may have missed.
5. When posible, always try to arrange to meet your professor prior to the start of the semester. This will give you the ability to introduce yourself and review ways in which you may be able to actively participate in class. Simple questions like will some of the class consist of movies we have to watch and provide feedback? Will part of the class be group interaction, lectures in the dark, etc? All of this can help set up expectations for the semester and also give you an opportunity to discuss potential solutions for when communication can break down.
6. When using an interpreter, it is vital that they also have access to the curriculum for the semester, new terms, project instructions, etc so they can also help support your needs.
This list is not extensive at all, but gives you an idea of some things that could help. Best of luck in school and we wish you much success.

member
Posted on Feb 10, 2014

Quote:Originally posted by dtmiot:
Hi. I'm so sorry that you feel that having a hearing loss is something to be ashamed of. That's part of the cultural norm that needs to be changed! For me it's not that I'm ashamed, it's that it's such a pain having to constantly remind the people around you that you CAN'T hear! Even my husband of 17 years still talks to me from several rooms away and it's always me that has to walk to him so that I can hear him. People with glasses have an obvious clue, but you and I fit in as "normal" when most of the time I'm just faking my way through a conversation. You rock just the way you are and I hope that you know just how wonderful you are!

I agree with "dtmiot". We certainly can't walk around ashamed of ourselves. Everyone has a "disability" of some type. It's our responsibility to educate people on what we experience with our hearing loss and their responsibility to understand.

member
Posted on Feb 16, 2014

When one says suffering from a hearing loss, it may be misleading because the word “suffer” has nothing to do with a hearing loss that has no pain involved. After all, there’s no physical pain with most deafness. The dictionary says several meanings, to feel pain, to feel keenly, to be forced to endure or to sustain loss or damage. However, to suffer from hearing loss is misleading – it sounds like they are suffering due to diagnoses or disabilities. We are people first, so we do not suffer at all. It is okay to say that I suffer the loss of enjoying music and of carrying the normal conversation with people, however, it is not okay to say that I suffer the hearing loss.

I have the hearing loss, however, I’m fine. I live fine. I drive. I play golf. I travel everywhere. I have a family. I have three daughters and four grandkids. In my business, I provide services to all people. What the hell is going on? Like I have to hear that has nothing to do with it. It’s all about knowledge; it’s about the heart. It’s about abilities, about doing something you want and getting what you want out of life…Knowledge is the most powerful vehicle to success, not hearing, not speaking… (Revised quoted from CJ Jones) - We, the people with hearing loss, can do anything that hearing people can do … except hear. (revised from Frederick C. Schreiber)

Louis J. Schwarz, Deaf Advocacy Consultant; President, Tri-County Association of the Deaf; Board Member, Gallaudet University Alumni Association,
member
Posted on Feb 24, 2014

Quote:Originally posted by dtmiot:
Hi. I'm so sorry that you feel that having a hearing loss is something to be ashamed of. That's part of the cultural norm that needs to be changed! For me it's not that I'm ashamed, it's that it's such a pain having to constantly remind the people around you that you CAN'T hear! Even my husband of 17 years still talks to me from several rooms away and it's always me that has to walk to him so that I can hear him. People with glasses have an obvious clue, but you and I fit in as "normal" when most of the time I'm just faking my way through a conversation. You rock just the way you are and I hope that you know just how wonderful you are!

member
Posted on Feb 24, 2014

Quote:Originally posted by Pretty Money:

keep reminding your husband that you cannot hear him when he is talking from another room. ask him to come and see you I have to repeat what I think I heard the person say.

member
Posted on Mar 09, 2014

I am new to this site, this is my first post. I've been hearing impaired since childhood (I'm a baby boomer born in 1950) with moderately severe hearing loss in my left ear, my "bad" ear, as I call it. My latest audiogram in February 2014 shows that I now also have mild to moderate hearing loss in my right ear (my "good" ear) as well. I understand what you mean about feeling alone. I feel isolated when I can't join in a conversation because I don't understand what is being said. Don't feel self-conscious about wearing a hearing aid. A hearing loss is a lot more conspicuous than a hearing aid. Hearing aids are miracles that are there to help you.

Just call me...Jellybean
member
Posted on May 17, 2014

Quote:Originally posted by beautifultragedy:
Hi, so sorry you feel this way. 22 and I've been deaf all my life so I know the initial feelings of being alone and feeling ashamed. It took a while for me to stop being so ashamed of it and preoccupied with trying to fit in and just accept who I am. I know exactly how it feels to be embarrassed by hearing aides... I didn't get my first one till I was in middle school and I hated the fact that I was different because of it. i wore my hair down all the time in an attempt to hide it so it was a very difficult time for me to re-adjust and constantly fearing rejection from fellow classmates as they eventually found that I was hearing impaired. It turned out later on that I had nothing to worry about because many of my classmates were very sweet and understanding. They always made sure new teachers and substitutes knew of my disability and helped me with note taking and other various class activities and it stayed like that all the way up till our graduation. My point is, you are very likely to find people that are accepting of your hearing loss and it sounds like your family is very supportive, and you have us so you aren't alone :)

as for the business world, technically they can't turn you down because of your hearing aides. That's discriminating against a legally defined disability and they can get into trouble for it. The Americans with Disabilities Act was very clear about that :) there's tons of assistive listening devices out there for us to use in the workplace.

Yes, refusal to hire someone with hearing aids is serious legal trouble but who is stupid enough to make that mistake? Always some bs reason as to why you arent hired or why they let you go. Never hearing. They might as well offer a settlement when they let you go if that is the case.

member
Posted on May 17, 2014

Quote:Originally posted by HearingTheCall:
Great Article in the New York Times.

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/01/15/better-hearing-through-bluetoot...

www.libertyhealthsupply.com

That's the most rediculous thing I've ever seen in my life. Anyone who has a degree of serious hearing loss should not seriously consider this. This is a little better than the songbird hearing aid rip offs on tv.

Pages

Want to join the discussion?

Sign in or Join Now.